Networks

What Is SNMP and Why Use It?

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            SNMP. also called a Simple Network Management Protocol, is used to collect information to configure various network devices such as printers, routers, and servers on an IP network. SNMP was developed in 1988 to provide monitoring for network devices in TCP/IP networks and is now quite popular and often used for network management. This is useful because instead of managing the thousands of nodes that can be in a large network, an SNMP allows an administrator to monitor the nodes from a management host. SNMP manages your network by providing read/write abilities, collecting bandwidth information and error reports, alerting of low disk space, and also monitors your CPU and memory usage. SNMP v1 has a straightforward installation, however, cannot use 64-bit counters like SNMP v2. By using SNMP, one can properly manage and monitor their systems, which is crucial in maintaining a high-performing and reliable network.
            As this is my last blog posting for this particular class, I can honestly say that I enjoyed this experience very much and found it to be very useful in my attempts to understand the various topics covered in this Network Management & Infrastructure class. It is quite humorous to me how it seemed that sharing my knowledge with others seemed to benefit me more than what they received from reading my blogs. I plan on keeping an active blog as I continue both my educational and career goals. If you have been reading my posts, I want to thank you for your time and hope my information helps you as it has helped me.


Source:

“SNMP Basics: What is SNMP & How Do I Use It?”. Aaron Leskiw. Networkmanagementsoftware.com. Network Management Software

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Categories: Networks, Security

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