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Zendesk How-To Guide and References

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As I previously mentioned, my current task is preparing our company for our transition to a new CSM (Customer Service Manager), Zendesk. Today, I have a meeting scheduled with our agents to give them their first introduction to the program. Over the past few days, I have been piecing together an all-in-one resource for our agents to use in their daily duties; I figured a Google Doc would be the best format for this collection of how-to articles, screenshots, and a massive amount of useful links. In this post, I have added a small sample of this lengthy Google Doc. The actual Google Doc I am using is over 50 pages long and features company-specific information, so I obviously didn’t include it all and removed several of the screenshots. Hope it helps!

Zendesk

How-To Guide and References

 

 

Overview

This document collection has been created in the goal of providing K.E.R.I. customer service agents with a continually updated reference guide for use in their daily duties.

Goals

  1. Provide a general understanding of what Zendesk is, what it currently does, and what it can do in the future.
  2. Instruct customer service agents on how to perform simple operations such as logging into Zendesk.
  3. Provide customer service agents with a collection of helpful links that cover basic and advanced Zendesk Support operations.

What is Included

How to Log into Zendesk (Page 2)

Basic Instructions on how to log into the Zendesk website

Core Concepts for Getting Started with Zendesk Support (Page 4)

A general overview of Zendesk Support

How to Create a New Ticket (Page 10)

Step-by-Step instruction on how to create your first ticket

Ticket Type and Priority (Page 13)

Explaining the types and priorities of tickets

Reviewing Ticket History (Page 15)

How to view ticket conversations and events

Zendesk: Adding New Users (Page 17)

How to add new users, groups, organizations, and roles within Zendesk. Includes instructions on how to use the new user trigger and automation

Zendesk: Agent Out of Office Guide (Page 21)

How to use the Out of Office Trigger

Zendesk Mass Link Collection (Page 21)

A complete list of helpful Zendesk links

 

 

 

I. How to Log into Zendesk

Basic Instructions on how to log into the Zendesk website.

 

How to Log into Zendesk

1. Find the verification email in your Gmail from Zendesk

2. Follow the instructions of the Email

3. Navigate to https://yourdomain.zendesk.com in your internet browser

4. Sign in with your Gmail credentials. Select the fields circled in Yellow in the following images

II. Core Concepts for Getting Started with Zendesk Support

General overview of Zendesk Support.

Zendesk offers a centralized solution that organizes and tracks all incoming customer support requests from any channel. Use automations to increase support efficiencies, forums to enable your customers to help themselves, integrations with business-critical apps to extend functionality, and reports to track customer satisfaction. It’s simple and easy. You can be up and running in one day.

Navigation: Getting around inside your Zendesk

The following table gives an overview of the main areas in Zendesk. For more information see Introduction to the Zendesk agent interface.

 

Icon Name Description
Dashboard Summary information page. View summary information and vital statistics.
Getting Started Task list for configuring your Zendesk. Follow a step-by-step checklist of items to configure to get your Zendesk up and running.
Views Ticket groupings. Views define a collection of tickets based on a set of criteria. You create and use views to group tickets into one area, such as “My open tickets” or “Recently solved tickets.” For more information, see Using views to manage ticket workflow in the Zendesk Agent Guide.
Customer Lists Displays shared customer lists (created by Admins), and enables you to create personal customer lists for your own use.
Reporting Analytics of your support performance. Use pre-built reports or create custom Insights reports (Professional and Enterprise) for your business. Measure your customers’ satisfaction and the performance of your support team.
Admin Manage and settings pages. Browse and install apps or manage user profiles, views, ticket fields, macros, tags, business rules, account security settings and more.

 

Roles: Who uses Zendesk

Everyone at your company plays a role in supporting your customers. Depending on their assigned role, what they can see and what they can do in your Zendesk changes. For more, see Understanding Zendesk user roles in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.

Role

Quick definition

Description

Owner

Person who created your Zendesk The account owner is a type of administrator. The account name is associated with this person’s name, usually the person who created the account. There can only be one account owner; however, account ownership can be reassigned by the account owner to another administrator if needed. The account owner has access to areas of your Zendesk that other administrators do not, such as invoicing, payment options, and benchmarking for the account.
Administrator Person in charge of your Zendesk Administrators are agents with additional privileges to manage and customize your Zendesk. Administrators can be assigned tickets, like agents, but can do many more things, such as edit business rules, change settings, assume another user’s identity, and more. There can be multiple administrators.
Agent Your support personnel Agents are the customer support individuals on your staff. They are assigned tickets and interact with customers as needed to resolve support issues.
End-user Your customer End-user refers to people who generate support requests from any of the available support channels (for example, via your Help Center, email, Twitter, or Voice). End-users can submit and track tickets and communicate with agents publicly (meaning their comments can never be private).

Ticket: Record of the support request conversation

Zendesk manages support requests by creating a ticket for each request. A ticket is simply a record of all conversations, from any channel; it keeps everything in one place and keeps your whole team in the loop. By creating a series of recorded events tied to one ticket, agents and end-users can stay on the same page; this also creates a level of accountability that can ensure a problem is solved quickly.

 

Item Quick definition Description
Ticket Support request with question or issue from customer Support requests received from any of your channels (see Channels: Ways to engage with customers) become tickets. Each ticket is assigned to an agent to solve, and all activity related to solving the support request is captured as comments within the ticket.
Ticket fields Containers for information about the ticket Ticket data is included in fields such as Subject, Email, Description, Status, Type, Priority, Group, Assignee, Tags, and any other custom fields you create. See About ticket fields in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.
Custom ticket fields Containers for specific information about your tickets You can add custom fields to tickets that are visible to agents only or to both agents and end-users. Custom fields are typically used to gather more information about the support issue or product or service. See Adding custom ticket fields in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.
Status Current ticket situation Each ticket is assigned a status. There are five values for status: New, Open, Pending, Solved, Closed. See About ticket fields in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.
Type Support request category Each ticket is assigned a type. There are four values for type: Question, Incident, Problem, Task. The ticket type is used throughout your Zendesk to generate views and it’s also used as a condition in automations, macros, and triggers.
Priority Urgency of the ticket Each ticket is assigned a priority. There are four values for priority: Low, Normal, High, and Urgent. See About ticket fields in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.
Tag Word(s) associated with the ticket or article to categorize it To help you categorize, act on, or search for tickets and forum articles, you can add tags. Once added, you can create views by tags, search for tags and the tickets in which they are included, and use tags in your triggers, automations, and macros. See Using tags in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.
Requester Person who made the support request Requester refers to the person who opened the ticket and made the support request.

Channels: Ways to engage with customers

Channels are the pathways in which you can engage with your customers and receive support requests.

Channels include:

For information about these channels, see the About Zendesk channels in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.

Email options

The following table provides an overview of some ways you can customize your email. For a complete introduction, see Getting started with email in Zendesk in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.

Email Quick definition Description
Personalized email replies Your reply-to email name The email address used in replies to end-users can be configured to show the agent’s name as the friendly name rather than your Zendesk account name. For example, “Claire Grenier <notifications-support@myaccount.zendesk.com >” instead of “MondoCam Support Center < notifications-support@myaccount.zendesk.com >”. See Enabling personalized email replies in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.
Email forwarding Send email from your company support email address to your Zendesk When you set up your Zendesk account, a default email address is created that end-users can use to submit support requests. You might prefer to use your own email address rather than the Zendesk-provided address. You can use email forwarding to accept email at your own address (for example, help@mycompany.com)) and then forward it to your Zendesk address (support@mycompany.zendesk.com). See Forwarding email from other email providers in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.
External email domain Change email address “From” field You can change your email address to an email domain other than myaccount.zendesk.com, making it appear that it originated from your own email address (help@mycompany.commailto:help@mycompany.com ). See Using an external email domain in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.
Email pass-through Identical reply-from email addresses When forwarding email from external email addresses or using an external email domain for outgoing email, the Reply-From address (the address that end-users see in email responses to their support requests) can be configured to use the same email address that was used to submit the request. See Setting up email pass through in the Zendesk Administrator Guide.

 

III. How to Create a New Ticket

Step-by-Step instruction on how to create your first ticket

Navigate to your home screen, by clicking the icon.

At the upper right of your screen, select the ‘+ Add’ button.

Next, you will see the option to either create a new Ticket, User, Organization, Search, or view Recently Viewed Tickets. Select, Ticket.

Now, you will be shown the standard ticket form. In the box to the left (marked in yellow), you notice a long list of fields you can fill out to add information into the ticket. In the larger box to the right (marked in green), you can enter both a public reply (seen by customer) or an internal note (seen only by you and other agents. The more data you enter, the better Zendesk will work.

Notice that you can select the ‘T’ under the comment box for text options, the ‘staple’ image for adding images, and the ‘magnifying glass’ to add content to the automated help center (not active yet).

At the bottom left of your screen, you will see ‘Apply Macro;’ this opens up all of the canned responses that we have created. Macros can make your life much easier by auto-generating responses, auto-adding triggers, and other useful functions.

Finally, when you are done finishing your ticket, you are now ready to submit it. At the bottom right of your screen, select ‘Submit as –.’ You will then be able to choose to submit the ticket at New, Open, Pending, or Solved; once that is done, go ahead and pat yourself on your back. You completed your first ticket!

IV. Ticket Type and Priority

Explaining the types and priorities of tickets

There are two optional (but very helpful) ticket properties that are used for sorting and managing your ticket queue. They both can convey how urgently a ticket needs to be addressed.

Type

The first property is the ticket type and there are four predefined choices: Question, Problem, Incident, and Task. The ticket type is optional and selected manually by an agent when triaging a new ticket.

Question is used to indicate that the requester’s issue is a question rather than a problem that needs to be solved.

Problem is used to indicate that the requester is having an issue with your product or service that is likely to be experienced by other customers.

Incident is used for occurrences of a problem that affects more than one person. Incident tickets are linked to a problem ticket and when the problem ticket is solved all the incidents of that problem are solved automatically at the same time.

Task is used when you want to assign the ticket as a task to a specific agent. When you select Task, you also set the Task Due Date.

Priority

The ticket priority helps you to convey the level of urgency for each ticket and can be used in the rules you set up in Zendesk Support to manage tickets.

There are four values for priority: Low, Normal, High, and Urgent. How you weight the priority of your tickets is up to you. For example, you might assign a ticket to Urgent based on the customer who submitted the request or based on how many hours have passed since the ticket was created.

V. Reviewing Ticket History

How to view ticket conversations and events

As mentioned earlier, when a customer replies to an email notification a new comment is added to the ticket. As an agent works to resolve a problem, there may be many messages back and forth between the agent and the customer. We refer to this as the ticket conversation. Along the way, a ticket may be updated by macros and other automation tools like triggers that alter a ticket’s properties and content.

There are two views of the ticket data: the one we’ve shown you so far (the ticket properties and comments) and also a tickets events and notification history.

To see this, look at your test ticket and above the first ticket comment, you’ll see the Conversations drop-down list. Use this to choose what to display in the body of the ticket.

 

  • Conversations display only communication between the agent and the customer, or the agent and other agents.
  • Events display all replies, status changes, and so on, applied to the ticket by an agent or a business rule.

 

We mentioned triggers earlier in this lesson and you know that they’re used to automatically update tickets based on some ticket criteria. This events view of the ticket shows you when a trigger updated the ticket. You’ll also see when another agent was CC’d on the ticket and so on.

As mentioned earlier, when a customer replies to an email notification a new comment is added to the ticket. As an agent works to resolve a problem, there may be many messages back and forth between the agent and the customer. We refer to this as the ticket conversation. Along the way, a ticket may be updated by macros and other automation tools like triggers that alter a ticket’s properties and content.

There are two views of the ticket data: the one we’ve shown you so far (the ticket properties and comments) and also ticket events and notification history.

To see this, look at your test ticket and above the first ticket comment, you’ll see the Conversations drop-down list. Use this to choose what to display in the body of the ticket.

· Conversations displays only communication between the agent and the customer, or the agent and other agents.

· Events displays all replies, status changes, and so on, applied to the ticket by an agent or a business rule.

We mentioned triggers earlier in this lesson and you know that they’re used to automatically update tickets based on some ticket criteria. This events view of the ticket shows you when a trigger updated the ticket. You’ll also see when another agent was CC’d on the ticket and so on.

 

VI. Zendesk: Adding New Users

How to add new users, groups, organizations, and roles within Zendesk. Furthermore, instructions on how to use the new user trigger and automation.

New Customer Service Agent:

Add User:

Under Manage tab, Select People, then Add User. Enter Name, Email, Role, and Brand they will be operating (if no specific brand, select Keyless Entry Remote Inc.

Add Group, Organization, Role:

If a New User needs to be added to a specific Group, Organization, or Role, you can perform this by selecting Add User, Group, or Organization in the same location as the Previous instructions for Add User.

Triggers-

Add new agents name in the (Assignee is -)

This trigger is used primarily for Training/QA. Allows new agents to have their work monitored.

Automations-

Notify of New Agent Open Ticket with no Activity (ADD NEW AGENTS NAME TO ASSIGNEE)

Add new agents name in the (Assignee is -)

Training/QA. Allows new agents to have their work monitored.

VII. Zendesk: Agent Out of Office Guide

Triggers:

1. Navigate to Business Rules, and then Triggers.

2. Select Out of Office (ENTER NAME OF AGENT WHO IS OUT OF OFFICE)

3. In Conditions, edit the bottom condition ‘Assignee is –‘ with the agent who is out of office’.

4. Select Save

VIII. Zendesk Mass Link Collection

Complete list of helpful Zendesk links.

*Note* For quick reference, open this document in Word. Then, in the ‘Home’ tab, navigate to the top right of the window and select ‘Find;” this will allow you to search this document for the correct article to help you with your issue or question.

Items marked with a ★ are great resources for the basics!

Zendesk YouTube Videos

Zendesk.com Articles

Agent Guide for Support

Zendesk Basics

User Access and Security

Users, Groups, and Organizations

Tickets

Channels

Email

Workflows

Reporting

Best Practices and Recipes

Integrations

Zendesk Support App for Mobile

Extending Zendesk Support

Support Tips

Source:

Image and Content: Zendesk. (2019). Zendesk Support. Retrieved from https://support.zendesk.com/hc.

 

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