Software

8×8 Virtual Contact Center: Voicemail Queues- Part 2

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Today, I had a chance to demonstrate the proposed changes to our 8×8 Virtual Contact Center’s voicemail-retrieval system. Per yesterday’s post, I am attempting to eliminate the usage of Zendesk, our CSM, for many of our agents who only deal with phone transactions. With the new method of using the voicemail queues to auto-assign voicemails to agents by auto-dialing the voicemail queue for them, instead of accessing the voicemail-to-email ticket in Zendesk, we can save $99 per agent/per month (nice, right?)

Before the meeting, I pre-loaded the test voicemail queue with some voicemails to be used to demonstrate the new process of accessing them. Additionally, since the meeting was away from my desk and in another employee’s office, I had to remove myself from the queue and add that other person. Pro tip: always arrive at the location of your meeting beforehand so you can ensure everything works (had to redo the verification call within the 8×8 VCC GUI; that would have been embarrassing).

Everything seemed to work well enough, but the process created more questions than answers. With the voicemail queues calling each agent and connecting them to a customer’s voicemail, we need to ensure that this doesn’t happen before or in-place of a regular inbound call; however, by setting different priority levels on the queues, we can quickly remove this worry.

Then, we found that we would like to separate each brand’s voicemail queue by whether it is a sales or service question/issue; the rest of the outbound and inbound queues are already built like this. By creating another service voicemail queue for each brand and applying it to all the service options in each call script, our agents will be able to know the nature of a call, before they accept it.

Since the meeting, I have finished the following items:

  • Remove (person) and add (person) from Voicemail Test Queue.
  • Give (person) phone number for Voicemail Test Queue.
  • Disable Voicemail-to-Email feature in Test VM Queues: (will only happen if they press 1 (I can’t edit this)).
  • Edit Voicemail Test Queues to have lower priority levels than the Normal Inbound/Outbound Queues.
  • Create a new Inbound Phone Queue to Test Priority levels: the script, Voicemail-Inbound Priority Test, has been created and the number xxx-xxx-xxxx has been assigned to it. The queue, Inbound Test for Voicemail, has been built and assigned to the above script. The priority level has been set to 8, whereas the Voicemail Queue is set to 4.

The following item needs clarification before completing:

  • Create Sales and Service Voicemail Queues for each brand:

Each brand now has a separate sales and service voicemail queue; each queue has been added in each script in the appropriate spot; this voicemail separation of sales and service will only occur with input from the caller (if they press 1 for sales, they get the sales VM, if they press 2 for service, they get the service VM).

I can’t separate voicemails in each call script (brand) by whether they are sales or service without the input from the customer (for example, in a script, if the caller doesn’t press anything after the menu prompt and we are closed, they would just get sent to a Sales VM); as most of our callers do opt to input their choice after the menu, this shouldn’t be an issue.

In the future, I can add a short question before forwarding to a voicemail (if we are closed), asking whether it is a sales or service call, which would then route them to the correct voicemail queue.

For the next phase of the project, I will test out the voicemail queue’s priority level by loading it up with some messages, setting myself as available within the agent GUI, and then having someone call the inbound queue that I am assigned to. Ideally, the inbound queue will be prioritized first, offering me that call before the voicemail.

Who knew voicemails could be so complicated?

 

 

 

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